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  • June 27, 2022, 08:31:55 AM

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Author Topic: NP119 T-Case questions  (Read 742 times)

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Offline zeebo76

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NP119 T-Case questions
« on: March 11, 2022, 06:11:17 PM »
I have an NP119 T-Case I'm considering for my Eagle project.  However, after a good deal of searching, hard data on this T-Case is hard to come by.

My project involves swapping my Eagle's 258/TF998/NP128 combo with something more "mechanical".  I'm certain of two things:  I will be swapping the 258 for an (AMC) 360, and the TF998 for an AX15.  The transfer case is the final sticking point.  I have in my possession both an NP119 and an NP242.  The NP242 is clearly the sturdier option, however the unobtrusive nature of the NP119 appeals to me.  The car won't be used for anything other than street and (very) light trail duty, and I won't be making any power-increasing modifications to the 360 outside of the standard de-cluttering/de-smogging.

I would appreciate any input (anecdotal or otherwise) about the NP119 that would contribute to my understanding of its longevity and reliability.  As it was a very short-lived option for Eagles, I'm not sure how many people would have experience with it.  However, it seems logical to me that it would share quite a bit with the NP129 T-Case used in Eagles for the overwhelming majority of their production run.  Other than the ability to shift out of 4WD, of course.

Thanks in advance.

Online Trooper

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Re: NP119 T-Case questions
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2022, 09:38:11 AM »

Online amcfool1

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Re: NP119 T-Case questions
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2022, 12:38:23 PM »
hi, if you get a 360 into an Eagle, you will be one the few. Good luck, and keep us posted.
The best way to add more power is to put in a stroker 4.0 . Putting a V8 in is fiendishly difficult. Again, good luck!   gz

Offline Canoe

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Re: NP119 T-Case questions
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2022, 05:44:28 PM »
With the 360, you've got to find a way to hang the front diff/axle. 4.0 or 4.0 stroker has the flange for that.

I too would be strongly suggesting you take a look at a 4.0 or a 4.0 stroker. And there's a wide range in choices in doing that. And it's a more modern engine, better balances available between performance, performance choices, reliability, parts availability, fuel usage and emissions. Cheapest quality way is buying a stroker pre-made. More fun to build your own, but usually a lot more expensive, even for the same end result for the low-end crate 4.0 strokers. Do a lot of research. (I didn't, and I paid 4x over what a crate 4.0 stroker costs, to have my 258 rebuilt with 4.0 head, cam, etc.; I got exactly what I wanted, but a crate 4.0 stroker would have more power, more torque, with lower fuel use, etc.. Only extra beyond drop it in, is drilling and tapping for the diff/axle supports.)

As for more mechanical, the NP128 is the only Eagle transfer-case that doesn't have a viscous ring inside to fail and contaminate the TC and ruin it if not caught in time (and where do you get a replacement part, vs. a replacement TC). I ran an '81 with the NP119 in it; loved it - great driving feel. When I got the '86 with the NP128, same, until I was immediately disappointed with it in the first snow - until I got snow tires. I still have an upgraded TC in mind, but with good tires, I've had it over 15 years and somehow an upgraded TC just hasn't been a nag. With on-road, if not slippy surfaces (or you get good tires), if not giving it crazy upgraded HP/torque (see below), I believe the NP128 is the way to go. And you've already got one. Check it over (fluid debris? wear? seals?), and if good thoroughly drain it, fill it back up with ATF+4. (Might want to do the drain & fill twice a month apart if you didn't like the old fluid, so the residual fluid gets diluted and mostly flushed with the 2nd change. A flush is an idea, but I don't know what would do that without residual flush fluid compromising the new fluid; after a few days, a second drain & fill?)

Depending on the HP and torque you put in it, you may need a beefier TC. (and diffs?) NP242 is fine, you don't need the hummer version. If you're only going to drive on-road, and no steep mountains with a trailer, etc., if you got a TC with high-low, you wouldn't be the first person to not have a control inside and leave it permanently in high. The NP128's vac high-low shift 'motor' may or may not be adaptable to other TCs. There's also other TCs than the Np242 that are beefier than the Eagle TCs.

Offline zeebo76

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Re: NP119 T-Case questions
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2022, 08:59:03 PM »
Here's a bit of info...

http://amceaglesden.com/guide/NP119_Transfer_Case
I've read through that page, but no mention of applicable torque ratings that I can see, which is my primary concern.  Thank you, though.

hi, if you get a 360 into an Eagle, you will be one the few. Good luck, and keep us posted.
The best way to add more power is to put in a stroker 4.0 . Putting a V8 in is fiendishly difficult. Again, good luck!   gz
I'm quite handy with a welder.  Fitting the 360 in won't be a problem, it's getting a space to do it in that's proving to be an issue.  There will definitely be pictures posted to the Den, don't worry.  :)

With the 360, you've got to find a way to hang the front diff/axle. 4.0 or 4.0 stroker has the flange for that.

I too would be strongly suggesting you take a look at a 4.0 or a 4.0 stroker. And there's a wide range in choices in doing that. And it's a more modern engine, better balances available between performance, performance choices, reliability, parts availability, fuel usage and emissions. Cheapest quality way is buying a stroker pre-made. More fun to build your own, but usually a lot more expensive, even for the same end result for the low-end crate 4.0 strokers. Do a lot of research. (I didn't, and I paid 4x over what a crate 4.0 stroker costs, to have my 258 rebuilt with 4.0 head, cam, etc.; I got exactly what I wanted, but a crate 4.0 stroker would have more power, more torque, with lower fuel use, etc.. Only extra beyond drop it in, is drilling and tapping for the diff/axle supports.)

As for more mechanical, the NP128 is the only Eagle transfer-case that doesn't have a viscous ring inside to fail and contaminate the TC and ruin it if not caught in time (and where do you get a replacement part, vs. a replacement TC). I ran an '81 with the NP119 in it; loved it - great driving feel. When I got the '86 with the NP128, same, until I was immediately disappointed with it in the first snow - until I got snow tires. I still have an upgraded TC in mind, but with good tires, I've had it over 15 years and somehow an upgraded TC just hasn't been a nag. With on-road, if not slippy surfaces (or you get good tires), if not giving it crazy upgraded HP/torque (see below), I believe the NP128 is the way to go. And you've already got one. Check it over (fluid debris? wear? seals?), and if good thoroughly drain it, fill it back up with ATF+4. (Might want to do the drain & fill twice a month apart if you didn't like the old fluid, so the residual fluid gets diluted and mostly flushed with the 2nd change. A flush is an idea, but I don't know what would do that without residual flush fluid compromising the new fluid; after a few days, a second drain & fill?)

Depending on the HP and torque you put in it, you may need a beefier TC. (and diffs?) NP242 is fine, you don't need the hummer version. If you're only going to drive on-road, and no steep mountains with a trailer, etc., if you got a TC with high-low, you wouldn't be the first person to not have a control inside and leave it permanently in high. The NP128's vac high-low shift 'motor' may or may not be adaptable to other TCs. There's also other TCs than the Np242 that are beefier than the Eagle TCs.
Putting a 360 in it is most of the reason for the project - I'm not after more power, though that is a happy side effect of the swap.  I'm after a 360.  It'll be a show car and sunday cruiser, so concerns like economy, power, parts availability are secondary concerns.  I haven't shared many details of the project here but suffice to say it will be a unique Eagle when I'm finished with it.

As far as other inputs, thank you, you've made good points.  The viscous ring in the NP119 would be a concern, and I know the NP242 has quite the high reputation in Jeep circles, so that's what I'll be going with I suppose!

Offline Canoe

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Re: NP119 T-Case questions
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2022, 08:22:49 PM »
I've read through that page, but no mention of applicable torque ratings that I can see, which is my primary concern. 

... Depending on the HP and torque you put in it, you may need a beefier TC. (and diffs?) NP242 is fine, you don't need the hummer version.
The viscous ring in the NP119 would be a concern, and I know the NP242 has quite the high reputation in Jeep circles, so that's what I'll be going with I suppose!

I can't recall seeing any specs for the Eagle TCs. For torque alone, I think you're going to have to go for a non-Eagle TC. You could match the 360 torque the way you'll build it up, and compare that to Eagle TCs people have used successfully with 4.0 and 4.0 strokers, but I fear the sample size is too small to do that reliably.

I have seen many specs for the various TCs used in the jeeps. Some are 'hardened' by their choice of rebuild components too. But most of those are for off-road. You won't need the heavier duty 242 that was in hummers.

Your Full-Time High candidates are 219, 228, 229, 242, 247 and 249. The 219, 229 and 249 are Viscous, the 228 (no high lock) and 242 are Open (no viscous to fail), the 247 is Gyro-Clutch, and the 249 is 'special'. Some have multiple versions, so watch out for that if you're picking one that mates easily with drive-shafts (below).

The 242 is the one that's Open (no viscous) and has it all: full-time high, high lock, low & 2wd. I don't know if you could have the same dash controls drive the vac 'motor' to maintain the switching between full-time high and 2wd high. But be aware that the 242 is "four-wheel-drive, high (48/52 differential torque-biased-drive)". Novak says New Venture docs show the 242 as rated to 1486 ft. lbs. of torque. They may be a good source if you're looking for TC torque ratings. https://www.novak-adapt.com/knowledge/transfer-cases/

I believe you're going to have to go to the Jeep world to see what torques the TCs handle. Then back to the Eagle world to see which have been:
* successfully installed in Eagles
* with what work for mating with the drive shafts.

Also, depending on the torque, you might be into new drive-shafts, universal joints, or even diffs & axles.

I seem to recall there being a fairly recent thread (within past few years) on going for a 242 in an Eagle.
search gave me these
https://forums.amceaglesden.com/index.php?topic=46050.msg356613#msg356613
https://forums.amceaglesden.com/index.php?topic=46609.msg360172#msg360172
https://forums.amceaglesden.com/index.php?board=11.0
you're also in the yoke, etc., queue, so https://forums.amceaglesden.com/index.php?topic=47171.0
likely more

Offline atmafox

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Re: NP119 T-Case questions
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2022, 12:09:36 AM »
I put a 247 in my Eagle, though my classic shop did have to trim down the input shaft on it.
Mine:
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