News:
Putting FUN and FRIENDLINESS, FIRST into owning and learning about AMC small bodied cars, primarily Eagles, Spirits and Concords as well as vehicles built in AMC's Mexican subsidiary, VAM.

  The AMC Eaglepedia can now be accessed using the buttons found below  This is a comprehensive ever growing archive of information, tips, diagrams, manuals, etc. for the AMC Eagle and other small bodied AMC cars. 

Also a button is now available for our Face Book Group page.


Welcome to the AMC Eagles Nest.  A new site under "old" management -- so welcome to your new home for everything related to AMC Eagles, Spirits and Concords along with opportunities to interact with other AMC'ers.  This site will soon be evolving to look different than it has and we will be incorporating new features we hope you will find useful, entertaining and expand your AMC horizons.  And, if you were you banned at another AMC Eagle Forum and cannot log in here?  Let us know and we will fix it for you. 

You can now promote your topics at your favorite social media site by clicking on the appropriate icon (top upper right of the page) while viewing the topic you wish to promote.


  • August 04, 2020, 06:40:32 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: 1985 Eagle Solenoid location?  (Read 692 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Canoe

  • Eagle Sundaancer
  • ******
  • Posts: 967
  • Thumbs Up 48
Re: 1985 Eagle Solenoid location?
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2020, 08:30:28 PM »
I wonder if there's space in that unicorn-box for all those wires, switches and a GM HEI Ignition Module?

I know I emptied a stock AMC Ignition Module box and mounted a GM HEI Ignition Module inside there.

Offline Taylor

  • Administrator
  • Eagle Sport
  • ******
  • Posts: 282
  • Thumbs Up 15
Re: 1985 Eagle Solenoid location?
« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2020, 11:14:09 PM »
Definitely looks like a prior owner has done a little problematic customization. This might help.
2010 Toyota Rav4 Daily Driver (better mileage)
1985 AMC Eagle Limited wagon 🖖🏼🦅
2005 Ford Excursion 4X4 wife's around town daily driver.

Offline Longhunter

  • Eagle
  • **
  • Posts: 33
  • Thumbs Up 2
Re: 1985 Eagle Solenoid location?
« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2020, 04:40:52 AM »
UPDATE:
 All, Spouse had Eagle towed to repair shop. They also had no idea what the "switch box" was. They guessed it was some sort of "additional" starting, cranking, system. But truly had no idea. What they did was attempt to start car by bypassing the box. Car started right up and is running great. I had them totally remove the box and return the harness to factory configuration.

Now with it running they were able to get it able to pass Texas inspection. Horn needed relay and license plate light needed bulb. Had to adjust emergency brake as it was not holding car in place. Other than those small items it is good to go and wife passed inspection yesterday. 

Bad news, but to be expected. I was able to video chat with mechanic from here in Syria while he had car on lift. SERIOUS leaks in several places in engine. Everytime she parks it somewhere they is definite oil leak on the ground pavement when she moves it. Definitely needs rear main seal and other engine seals??, valve cover is missing a bolt and has warped out so the hole no longer lines up with head. Mechanic is afraid to torgue the plastic cover too much as he thinks it is too brittle and will break.
Same type issues with transmission, leaking badly. Also showed me same issue with transfer case and plastic boots around brake parts (I am not a mechanic so not sure what they are called) need replacing as they appear to have dry rotted.

So here are some questions:
1. Car has 160,000 on it. I am contemplating having the engine and transmission taken out and rebuilt as well as the other things that need repair. Is this something that makes sense at this point or should I just fix current leaks and then fix things as they break?

I ask because I am thinking it is better to just fix everything now and hopefully have no worries in the future. I figure if I make it all "new" again then the car will outlive me. I am concerned about being out somewhere and an old part, leak give out and then I am stranded. Not to say a new rebuild would not do that but a lot less chance.

Thank you for advice.


Offline Canoe

  • Eagle Sundaancer
  • ******
  • Posts: 967
  • Thumbs Up 48
Re: 1985 Eagle Solenoid location?
« Reply #18 on: July 16, 2020, 07:38:33 PM »
For any "rebuild", wait until you're back.

For the rear seal, there was one mechanic here where I live that claimed you could do that by lifting the car, supporting the transfer-case and trans, separate the trans from engine, then fish the old seal out with a coat-hanger, then lube the new seal with fresh engine oil and slide it in.

It's also common, and a pain, to replace the oil pan gaskets. Plural. But it's an opportunity to clean it out and to put a new oil pump in (before that fails) since you're there. Done right it should last. Needing redoing at 160K is not a surprise. There are better gaskets now for that too.

Those stock valve covers do become brittle and break. To get a stock one in place, you need the Felpro double-thick cork gasket. Then gasket adhesive on the bottom of the gasket and then for the top, either gasket adhesive if the channel on the valve cover is good, or a TINY bit of RTV gasket maker if it's not. You use minimal torque to put the valve cover on. Leave the RTV to set, then add a bit more torque. That was the solution 15 years ago: search the forum for other's advice on handling that. I had trouble after trouble until I went with the double-thick cork gasket (don't use two stacked...). An aluminum cover is nice, if you can get one for a reasonable price. I made my own steel one... lol

If the rubber boots at the brake pistons in the rear drum brakes and the front calipers are dry but intact, they can often be refurbished in place by rubbing with "ATE Brake Cylinder" lube/grease. First use some to lube the rubber to wipe any dirt off, then a clean coating of that left in place to lube.

If you ever pull the calipers to rebuild them, you use that grease on the pistons before you put them back into the calipers (astounding the difference in brake feel, compared to using the Permatex product for that). If you found any rust inside the calipers, use some EVAPO-RUST to remove the rust, rinse well, wipe dry, let sit until thoroughly dry. Paint with that ceramic brake paint caliper paint, cure, then rub a light coating of the ATE B.C. grease all over the inside and into the feed and bleed channels of the caliper, so they can't rust again.

I'd use the ATE Brake Cylinder lube/grease on any rubber with issues on the TC too.

You had the trans filter & fluid changed. I'd wait and see if it has any issues.

Rebuilding the stock 258 sounds nice, but putting a 4.0 head on it is a better upgrade. Even better, is putting a whole 4.0 in, so you get the fuel injected throttle body. There's a flange on the 4.0 block that will take the Eagle front diff mount. As long as the stock engine is running and not having problems, I'd say wait until you're back and put more research into it.

With a bent/warped valve cover, if you can't find an aluminum one cheap, if it's not leaking a lot, you should be able to have it limp along until you're home.

Offline Canoe

  • Eagle Sundaancer
  • ******
  • Posts: 967
  • Thumbs Up 48
Re: 1985 Eagle Solenoid location?
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2020, 09:28:37 AM »
...
Those stock valve covers do become brittle and break. ... An aluminum cover is nice, if you can get one for a reasonable price. ...
http://amceaglesden.com/guide/How_To_Upgrade_Your_Valve_Cover

Offline Canoe

  • Eagle Sundaancer
  • ******
  • Posts: 967
  • Thumbs Up 48
Re: 1985 Eagle Solenoid location?
« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2020, 01:03:07 PM »
...
If the rubber boots at the brake pistons in the rear drum brakes and the front calipers are dry but intact, they can often be refurbished in place by rubbing with "ATE Brake Cylinder" lube/grease. First use some to lube the rubber to wipe any dirt off, then a clean coating of that left in place to lube.

If you ever pull the calipers to rebuild them, you use that grease on the pistons before you put them back into the calipers (astounding the difference in brake feel, compared to using the Permatex product for that). If you found any rust inside the calipers, first use some EVAPO-RUST to remove the rust, rinse well, wipe dry, let sit until thoroughly dry. Paint with that ceramic brake paint caliper paint, cure, then rub a light coating of the ATE B.C. grease all over the inside and into the feed and bleed channels of the caliper, so they can't rust again.


Quote
ATE brake cylinder paste is used for repair, assembly and conservation of hydraulic brake components It is applied thinly and evenly to cylinder sleeves, pistons and seals
https://www.ate-info.de/en/details/produkte/ate-bremszylinder-paste-180-ml
This is what many European vehicle manufacteurs specify for their brakes.
I also use this anywhere I have rubber to refurbish or protect.

ATE Brake Cylinder ASSEMBLY PASTE
https://www.ebay.com/itm/ATE-Brake-Cylinder-ASSEMBLY-PASTE-BRAKE-RUBBER-GREASE-LUBE-180g-BREMSZYLINDER-/322804745197

https://forums.amceaglesden.com/index.php?topic=36545.msg294175#msg294175

The Permatex product for brake cylinders dries to like sticky molases in comparison.

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk